You will find below the list of the articles published in the last ten years of the Journal, classified per year, and comprising a summary for each article.


2013(12)-2012(10)-2011(14)-2010(12)-2009(13)-2008(15)-2007(12)-2006(11)-2005(12)-2004(16)-2003(17)-2002(13)-2001(11)-2000(11)-1999(6)-1998(7)-1997(10)-1996(11)-

Click on the year of interest to view summaries of the published articles. The number of publications in any one year is provided in the parentheses.

YEAR : 2013

Counselling and Spirituality, Volume 32 Number 1 : Spring
THEME : Children, Youth, and Spirituality


■ Article in French

Vandenhoeck A. et Dillen A. (2013). The Paradox of Pedagogization and the Implications for Pastoral Care in Pediatrics. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(1), 11-25

Abstract  : In this contribution we examine if and how the paradox of pedagogisation explains the difficulties that the spiritual care for children encounters in Belgian hospitals. The paradox refers to putting children in the centre of society with specialized education and care, pretending to respect the children’s dignity and their specific needs, and at the same time isolating them from the world of adults from which they need to be protected. The focus on specific educational needs of children often lacks the aspect of ‘spirituality’. One of the causes that limit spiritual care for children in Belgian hospitals is the presence of many other caretakers who work with a biopsychosocial model that does not include spiritual care as an element.


■ Article in English

Mayer S. (2013). EMDR, Spirituality, and Healing in Children. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(1), 27-36

Abstract  : The treatment modality Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing [EMDR] is an integrative approach that researchers have shown to be effective in dealing with post-trauma symptoms in both children and adults. In recent studies EMDR has been shown to be helpful in treating children and adolescents with various therapeutic issues, ranging from low self-esteem to major conduct disorders. In this article, the author elaborates on her work with children using the EMDR process to move the clients to a spiritual meaning-making that seems to foster more positive emotional states and adaptive behaviors. Theoretical support from theologians, religious educators and EMDR specialists is presented especially in regard to clients’ self-transcendent experiences.


■ Article in English

Nguyen T., & Bellehumeur C. (2013). Grieving the Loss Linked to Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivor: A Narrative Therapy in Search of Forgiveness. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(1), 37-58

Abstract  : A childhood sexual abuse survivor struggles unceasingly to learn how to trust and to love again. This article examines the literature related to survivors’ experience of being sexually abused, its consequences, and proposes a therapeutic model to work with them. A narrative therapy will be presented as a means of journeying with a sexual abuse survivor towards forgiveness, and a case study will be shared. Furthermore, a Christian Narrative approach will be further explored in the light of the survivor’s questions: “God, why me?” Finally, the implications of the narrative approach and suggestions for further therapeutic work will be discussed.


■ Article in French

Bellehumeur C. R., Renaud D. et Laplante J. (2013). An Empirical Study Exploring the Four Roles Identified among Catholic Pastoral Youth Ministers. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(1), 59-75

Abstract  : Using a socio-psychological model, this paper presents an innovative way to name four commonly encountered roles in youth ministry: teacher, foster parent, therapist and star. Based on a Canadian sample (N = 136), the results show that youth ministers have attitudes and skills that can be classified according to one or more of these four roles. The discussion, using on theological reflection, suggests that a better understanding of youth ministry roles appears to be useful in order to improve self-awareness and practices of youth ministers.


■ Article in French

Lefebvre S. (2013). and their Search of Meaning : Yesterday and Today. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(1), 77-100

Abstract  : This text is based on two perspectives. First, anthropologically, adolescence and youth are periods of effervescent faith and search for meaning; the theories saying that young people need a model should be re-examined in light of their diversified learning styles. These two perspectives are analysed via two great classical texts (Augustine’s Confessions and The Emile or Education, by Rousseau), which reveal that youth has always been the same, in some respects at least in our Western civilization. Second, two other sections develop some sociological trends on youth and religion in the West, as well as a counseling approach, using reflection on models and mentoring.


■ Article in English

Fitch T. & Reed L. G. (2013). [REGULAR ARTICLE] Travailler avec des clients suivant une direction spirituelle. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(1), 101-114

Abstract  : This text is based on two perspectives. First, anthropologically, adolescence and youth are periods of effervescent faith and search for meaning; the theories saying that young people need a model should be re-examined in light of their diversified learning styles. These two perspectives are analyzed via two great classical texts (Augustine’s Confessions and The Emile or Education, by Rousseau), which reveal that youth has always been the same, in some respects at least in our Western civilization. Second, two other sections develop some sociological trends on youth and religion in the West, as well as a counseling approach, using reflection on models and mentoring.


■ Article in English

Maraiba Christu M., James J., Caglayan A., Gadermann A., Klaassen D., & Slocum S. (2013). [REGULAR ARTICLE] Exploring how Contemplative Pratices Can Inform Counselling Psychology and Counsellor Training. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(1), 115-142

Abstract  : In this article, we describe a process of exploration and discovery that took place in a lab at the University of British Columbia’s graduate program in Counselling Psychology, which involved an experiential study of contemplative traditions. A general introduction outlines the relevance of these traditions to counselling psychology. We consider their import to counsellor training, ethical behaviour, cross-cultural competence, therapeutic interventions, self-awareness, and self-care. We decided to share our personal journey in this article in the hope that it will inspire others in the counselling profession to look deeper into the well of self-reflection and wisdom embodied in contemplative practices.



Counselling and Spirituality, Volume 32 Number 2 : Fall
THEME : Mindfulness in Counselling

■ Article in French

Nadia Iezzoni N. (2013). Measuring mindfulness? Counselling and Spirituality, 32(2), 13-31

Abstract  : This article addresses the question of measuring a Buddhist inspired practice applied currently in the field of clinical psychology, namely in North America, mindfulness. Firstly, variable definitions of mindfulness will be explored; secondly, two assessment tools of mindfulness will be presented, the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory and the Five Facet Mindful¬ness Questionnaire; thirdly and lastly, three criticisms made to these psycho¬metrical attempts to measure what seems to be unmeasurable will be out¬lined.


■ Article in English

Christopher J. C., Oswal N. & Mahesh Deokar M. (2013). Perspectives on Mindfulness from the Buddha's Homeland: A Focus Group Inquiry. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(2), 33-58

Abstract  : Mindfulness-based interventions have exploded in popular¬ity in North America and Western Europe over the past 10 years. While research indicates that these interventions have wide-ranging physical and psychological benefits, little consideration has been given to exactly how the West is appropriating a spiritual practice that has its roots in India. To begin exploring this issue we conducted a focus group with experts in Buddhist studies in India. We first conducted a three hour experiential workshop on mindfulness to give the participants a common understanding of how mind¬fulness is being employed in the United States. We then held a two and half hour focus group to consider the concerns and reservations that Indian experts in the theory and practice of Buddhist meditation had about the use of mindfulness in American healthcare. Five main themes were identified: a) Lay perception about meditation; b) importance of purity; c) similarities and differences between tradition and MBSR; d) purity may be a myth, and e) lessons for purists and pragmatists.


■ Article in English

Cleveland R. E., & Sink. C. A. (2013). A Mindfulness Approach to Educating Preservice School Counsellors about Spirituality. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(2), 59-77

Abstract  : Despite the growing demand to address the spiritual issues of K-12 students, many school counsellor preparation programs fail to pro¬vide adequate education in this domain. A mindfulness approach is proposed as a largely non-threatening and non-controversial way to introduce spiritu¬ality-related topics to preservice public school counsellors and to elementary and secondary students. After defining spirituality within a constructivist framework, the theoretical and empirical underpinnings of mindfulness as well as various programmatic (e.g., curricular and supervisorial changes) and practice-based (e.g., counselling interventions and techniques) recommenda¬tions for incorporating spirituality into the preservice counsellor education are presented.


■ Article in English

Chlebak C. M., James S., Westwood M. J., Gockel A. M., Bruno D. Zumbo B. D., & Shauna L. Shapiro S. L. (2013). Mindfulness Meditation & Gratitude Journalling: The Experiences of Graduate Counselling Psychology Students. Counselling and Spirituality, 32(2), 79-103

Abstract  : Stress-impacts, both short and long term, are well-docu¬mented occupational “land-mines” that counsellors navigate throughout their careers- in particular novice therapists and trainees (Shapiro, Brown, & Biegel, 2007). A known antidote is self-care, a process of creating and maintaining self-awareness and self-regulation (Baker, 2003). Its impact cannot be underestimated: self-care is integral in creating psychological wellness both personally and professionally and for counsellors, ethical obli¬gations are stipulated (APA, 2002; Elman, 2007; Harris, 2010). In literature, two emerging and theoretically linked self-care practices, mindfulness and gratitude (Nelson, 2009; Shapiro et al. 2007), were examined with nine graduate counselling psychology students. A 15-minute mindfulness medi¬tation and gratitude journalling intervention was conducted; qualitative data of weekly gratitude diaries and an interview at study-end was collected and analyzed. Four themes emerged from the interviews: a) Routine and Struc¬ture, b) Relationships, c) Attitudes of Mindfulness, and d) Overall Impacts. The diaries revealed three themes: Relationships, Situational/Life Circum¬stances, and Ineffable Life Enhancers. An argument is made for the inclusion of a mindfulness curriculum, further studies of gratitude counselling inter¬ventions, and a research-based mindfulness and gratitude relationship.


■ Article in English

Clark E. M., Holt C. L., Wang M. Q., Williams B. R., Schulz E. & and. Southward P. L. (2013). [REGULAR ARTICLE] Counselling and Spirituality, 32(2), 105-121

Abstract  : The present study examined the relationship between Active and Passive Spiritual Health Locus of Control (SHLOC) and three dimen¬sions of Social and Religious Capital (social support, interconnectedness, and community participation). Data were collected using a cross-sectional survey of a national sample of African Americans. Results indicated that participants with higher Active SHLOC perceived higher amounts of social and religious capital across all three dimensions. The relationship between Passive SHLOC and capital was less consistent. Theoretical and therapeutic implications are discussed.